YA Books you may have missed in 2017

As we’re getting ready to welcome in 2018, I’m looking back at all of the great books I’ve read this past year.  Last January I set a goal to read 50 books in 2017 . I wasn’t sure if I could really do it, but I’ve finished the year with 61 books read!

You can check out everything I’ve read this year on my Goodreads profile, but here are some of my favorites from the past year.

 

Caraval by Stephanie Garber

Believing that she will never be allowed to participate in the annual Caraval performance when her ruthless father arranges her marriage, Scarlett receives the invitation she has always dreamed of before her sister, Tella, is kidnapped by the show’s mastermind organizer.

 

 

Alex, Approximately by Jenn Bennett

Seventeen-year-old Bailey moves to California to live with her father and, perhaps, finally meet an online friend and fellow film buff, but soon finds herself attracted to an annoying co-worker.

 

 

Far From the Tree by Robin Benway

When Grace puts her baby up for adoption, she goes in search of her own biological family, discovering a younger sister, 15-year-old Maya, and an older brother, 17-year-old Joaquin who begin to forge relationships with each other.

 

 

Dear Martin by Nic Stone 

Writing letters to the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., seventeen-year-old college-bound Justyce McAllister struggles to face the reality of race relations today and how they are shaping him.

 

 

 

What To Say Next by Julie Buxbaum

When an unlikely friendship is sparked between relatively popular Kit Lowell and socially isolated David Drucker, Kit asks David for his help figuring out the how and why of her father’s tragic car accident.

 

 

The Border by Steve Schafer

After the slaughter of their families in Northern Mexico, teens Pato, Arbo, Marcos, and Gladys narrowly escape into the Sonoran Desert,pursued by the LaFrontera gang.

 

 

 

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

Eighteen-year-old Eliza Mirk is the anonymous creator of Monstrous Sea, a wildly popular webcomic, but when a new boy at school tempts her to live a life offline, everything she’s worked for begins to crumble.

 

 

 

-Mrs. DeVito
Head of Young Adult Services
East Meadow Public Library

 

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